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20090831
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Book TV 119
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CSPAN2 119
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2009 5:40am EDT
% unemployment, a banking system that we thought was the pride of america that's now insolvent. the pride of the world in fact that's not basically insolvent except it was saved by government recently. i could go on and on. >> no, you can't. no, you can't. your reaching or five minutes, mr. madrick. [laughter] >> retail sales even recently kept going down so we are in trouble here. well what would you be told by the defense? you will be told what you have heard time and again. it wasn't capitalism, it wasn't on guided capitalism. it was government that told the berlin and investment bankers and commercial bankers to invest in risky securities that did not understand. it was government that told the banking system to set up a compensation system that rewarded people not to manage risk but to take too much risk. it is government that old people and all of these new mortgage brokers sell mortgages to people who could not possibly understand that even when you can't understand them because he will make a lot of money and i can go on and on. >> you can't go on and on. >> i could go on and on a
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2009 8:00am EDT
that there is a narrative that goes along with a crummy decade which is that in the 1970s america fell away from its greatness. 1980, along comes a man on a great whitehorse, ronald reagan pulls it out and returned to greatness. that's a fairly standard take that a lot of conservative scholars used to explain the time and took the decade. my book tries to compensate both our understanding of carter and of the '70s by looking at the '70s on just as a time of decadence and disco which a definite, but also as a time of intersection. i think it was a lot of kind of soul-searching going on in the '70s. it was a time when people felt comfortable being tough on america, the films of apocalypse now, during this time, manhattan is a famous movie that jimmy carter himself jos twice at the white house during this period of time that i'm studying. and there's a real sense of humility that america has gone through a hard time through vietnam, watergate. and perhaps return to something that can never return to the kind of innocence that might once have had. i think there is a moral seriousness to the '70s that i
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2009 1:00am EDT
do believe that conservatives will govern america in the future. in my lifetime i have been involved three times at the national level of helping conservatives capture the republican party. in 1964 with goldwater, haiti with reagan and in 1994 the gingrich evolution so i think that we can do it again but this time to a very different and not just the control of the republican party but take control of all of american politics and win the gop. and again as americans. it will not be led by washington d.c. insiders, the people who caused the problem cannot cure the problem. they cannot fix it and we have as conservatives been betrayed. i wrote a book a few years ago called conservatives betrayed. george w. bush and other republicans hijacked the conservative cause. of all of our problems, with the problems obviously with the unions and mainstream media and this and that but that is not the real problem. we 13 landslide presidential elections in the 1980's with the same opponents. the problem quite frankly is the government republicans, george bush, karl rove, tom delay, denny hastert, i
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2009 12:00am EDT
neighbor and mr. obama fri has to go to the fifth summit of the americas and in trinidad and he has already been told by the mexican the and especially the brazilian president, lula da silva, he was going to run into some really heavy criticism in trinidad if something can't be done for the embargo. so they're still a long way to go. it could go fast, it could go slow and in his miami speech last may candidate obama suggested it was going to go slow. he promised to keep the rest of the embargo he said because united states needed to be a relentless advocate of democracy, and of quote. but slowly or quickly is very clear that our current dysfunctional policy is coming to the end of its life. what do i mean by dysfunctional? i mean that the united states and cuba have not had formal relations since january feared, 1961. that was e leffinge presidents ago -- 11 presidents ago. in contrast the u.s. estrangement from this movie gets revolution after the bolshevik revolution and is a strain from the people's republic of china after the fall of chang that lasted 16, 22 years respectively. the five
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2009 10:00pm EDT
of distinguished guests broke i have an newsmax one of the new on-line new media companies in america restarted 10 years ago and we reach 5 million americans most people know was best from newsmax.com but also publishes newsmax magazine and also many news.com online and reared dedicated the american public needs to hear both sides of the story we're seeing the obama presidency that the media is giving the public a one-sided view on important public policy issues. joining us today are a number of people involved with not only republican politics, a conservative politics but the media as well we have a number of powerhouse to describe the people on the panel today. some of them are not household names but names that carry significant weight in the conservative movement the far left is richard viguerie considered the godfather of conservative direct mail and has created the modern conservative movement by helping dozens and dozens of leading conservative groups in the nation bypass the media and recharge to get donors to support causes that advocate for conservative principles brought next to him is
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2009 10:00am EDT
aspires which is the history of the kgb in america. i don't think he fabricat the homo book you should be careful because in the same way i was careful whether or not i.f. stone hitchhiked to massachusetts so you do have some files that say he had conversations with some when he may or may not have known was the kgb agent. you can say that with confidence that there may be these documents which may say yes, we do not know that because we cannot say them so let's assume that they do. what do we know? 1936 i.f. stone had conversations with somebody who was a reporter working for the soviet wire service in america. he may or may not have known was a kgb agent and may or may not have been friendly or helpful. in 1936 he was a enthusiastic fellow traveler and very enthusiastic of the american communist party and premise supportive of tough soviet union in so far was the only country that supplied arms to the anish republic. also he was terrified of the threat of fascism. in 1937 i.f. stone of became his name because he was terrified fascism might come to america and his family was targeted.
CSPAN
Aug 2, 2009 12:30am EDT
of america, that is now insolvent. the pride of the world, in fact. it's not basically insolvent. except was saved by government recently. i could go on and on. >> no, you can't. no, you can't. you're reaching your five minutes. >> retail sales, even recently, kept going down. so we're in some trouble here. what will you be told by the defense? you will be told what you have heard time and again. that it wasn't capitalism. it wasn't unguided capitalism. it was government that did it. it was government that told those brilliant investment bankers and commercial bankers to invest in risky securities they did not understand. it was government who told the banking system to set up a compensation system that rewarded people not to manage risk but to take too much risk. it was government that told people, and all these new mortgage brokers, sell mortgages to people who could not possibly understand them, even when you can't understand them. because you'll make a lot of money on it. and i can go on and on, as you all know. >> no, you can't go on and on. you're using up your five minutes. >> you
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2009 7:00pm EDT
is an extraordinary icahn for latin america. he came to providence in 1960's which is when that america literature first came to international prominence and it became possibly the most popular and and most no literature in the world. it appeared in 1966 and not appear until the mid-1960s and not doing terribly well did not become later what it was to become an 1967 which was gabriel garcia marquez. his 100 years of solitude it was almost as if it was predestined it would finally cap latin-american and not all it was famous before he published it the most famous at this point* was ulysses his novel became famous oliver north america perhaps after he hadn't written the first that was it. it would be a best seller and a great latin-american novel. he just knew it. him and his friends started to write articles when even marquez was only halfway through it. it did not happen very often but it did then. most latin american novels published 500 or 1,000 would be a very good printer run in the 1960's but all of a sudden one-man publishes 8,000 was the first run and repeated a couple of weeks later and re
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2009 7:00pm EDT
. and this became an occasion for me to explain in america there is a company where you can actually borrow a car and give it back in what was interesting about that too one liberian member of the fugees was that he now lives in a culture amazingly enough where a total stranger would not only lead to a carbon trusted you to bring it back, that was a real shocker. i would try to explain that you give them this piece of plastic with some numbers on and if you take off with a car or crashes there will read a letter to this company called experian and then you can buy a house and tried to explain in you realize this is absurd. no wonder is so hard for refugees to figure out our culture. look at how many layers we have piled on to something as simple as borrowing a car and ellis of consequences can be very long if you screw up. in the there were other moments that were more serious and more poignant by thing for me one of the most poignant moments of my reporting was talking to a sudanese refugee about his experience coming to the u.s. charismatic incredibly talented soccer player at an academic schol
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2009 3:00pm EDT
couldn't even vote for a senator if you were an ordinary citizen. so, the struggle foremocracy in america is ongoing. i think theresa is onto something very important. i'm not sure ralph nader is necessarily the best witness for the prosecution, precisely because he did such a brilliant and important job of holding regulatory agencies to account. when he was the g who was a national figure, fighting for those issues. and now that he is -- made himself a presidential candidate he has become unfortunately very in effect tulle in the most important work he has done. t, the -- absolutely, absolutely we need more democracy in america and won't get it until there is serious popular will for that. >> if youook closely at the 1968 election, george wallace got 13.5% of the vote, it was i a good thing for democracy. >> this is an excellent question and when i look ba, third parties in america, most frequently in our century, have been basically formed by southerners, hoping to hold the balance of power in the electoral college co they could basically broker who the president wouldet to be and were
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2009 8:50pm EDT
? these aren't any first editions are they? >> no. these are books that mr. and mrs. america and all the ships at sea could call for any of the reading rooms in the library of congress. these are all books in the library's general collections. the first editions will be in the rare book room. >> if somebody doesn't know about darwin and they want to start? >> well, they might want to begin with one of the magazine articles that has recently -- his birthday has spawned, nature, scientific americans, science. and you can see here we have books for the younger reader because a lot of younger readers are collectors as darwin was. and here are the rest of darwin's complete works. but there are a number of good biographies of darwin and one of the best is janet brown, who's at cornell. her two-volume work of charles darwin voyaging and charles darwin the power of place. >> how did you get interested in this? >> my first job was in trinidad with william bee bee who was the first man to go down under the ocean in a bathosphere and he was a collector and he loved a.a. mill and charles darwin. and so wh
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2009 1:00am EDT
celebrities as he could to walk in the parades and attract recruit. the best known black man in america was jack johnson. he asked to join the service but he was an exile in paris and they wouldn't waive -- they did name a show after him. jack johnson was the biggest show the u.s. had. this is james reese, one of the best known men in harlem. the ahead of the music union. they wanted to hire musicians for society ball, they called him. some nights he would drive around harlem directing bands five or six different places. he would recruit from the streets of harlem. also the conductor of choice for a dance duo, vernon and irene castle. vernon castle was british citizen. and james muir traveled with them and got famous because of them. vernon castle joined the raf. they served in the 7th and 131st and the recruiting office was around the corner the cigar store. this is the tree of hope people touched for good luck, and they marched around with broomsticks on their shoulders instead of rifles. hayward used his wealthy friends to buy uniforms. they were porters and elevator operators and ar
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2009 9:30am EDT
into a motion picture from warner brothers. its subject is america after an electromagnetic pulse attack. thank you again for being here. good to see you. >> thank you. >> i'm afraid there are many people waveng who perhaps don't know what an electromagnetic pulse attack would be. maybe we'd start with your explaining that attack. >> it's a byproduct of any detonation of any nuclear weapon. first realizing some testing in the '60s and before we go any further, i know this sounds like sci-fi. so you in the audience, folks watching this later -- if this sounds like sci-fi, this evening go on the internet, google up emp, go to wikipedia. here's a couple of other things you should look up. starfish crime which was the american test in 1962 of detonating a weapon in space which blew out a fair part of the power grid in hawaii. also look up soviet test 184. and then finally if you want to look at a completely different aspect of emp look up the carrington event which was actually triggered by a solar storm. and to go back to answering your question, emp, electromagnetic pulse, is a byproduct of deton
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2009 10:00pm EDT
in america because that was right up to the time i finished writing the book. so i think anybody that reads inside the beltway i see that you have a paperback copy, it's on paperback now, will find a lot of humor is true tales that have been told inside washington that they will not have read anywhere else and just like "weed man" i picked out the finest stories like with the stored marijuana in the basements of churches and got more room on the island with 40,000 pounds of wheat and build a house out of the bales and i try to bring some humor to the beat which is what i've done. >> host: john, thank you very much. i've enjoyed this discussion and urge the few words to take a fresh look at marijuana smuggling and read "weed man." >> guest: thank you. i appreciate that very much. .. >> the soviet army and task forces in 1991 since published in russia in his book the icebreaker and in this book he argues a widely accepted theory regarding the origins of world war ii were erroneous. in his new book, it "the chief culprit" stalin's grand design to start world war ii" dr. suvorov furthers his id
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2009 1:00am EDT
, and now weave citigro, bank america, these large, massive commercial banks with massive deposits -- you have to remember, an investment bank like lehman brothers doesn't take in deposits. it invests money around the world and sells stocks and bonds, about it doesn't have people'soney in the bank the way bank of america and citigroup do. they have over a trillion dollars of real money in those banks and those are savings accounts and checking accounts, paychecks from hard-working people, and what we started to see in 2004 and 2005 a 2006 on the trading floor of lehman brothers was a very clear increase in leverage. lehman brothers was incasing our debt to try to compete with the big boys, and we got deeper and deeper and deeper involved into businesses and into investmes that were very, very difficult to move as the years went on, and lehman got deeper and deeper into the storage business. in writing this book, i reached out to so many people. 150 people up and down the firm. and i will never forget in those days in september, october, and november, and especially december, when people f
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2009 12:00pm EDT
's reaffirming of america in terms of its values and ideals and the power of the constitution feared that to me is the greatest joy for any writer and journalist and that's the story and try to tell in my books. >> host: we talked about the books you have written. what is next? >> guest: and house -- i am fascinated with malcolm x and wondering if it is time to look again at malcolm x and also given the tremendous diversity of the american population today i'm interested in the founding fathers of this new america. we have seen books about the accounting bothers of america as it emerged in 1700's. i think this time again is to look at a founding fathers of this new america and one represents to the world. >> host: dui d.c. to read about these issues or is it a challenge? >> guest: writing is the greatest intellectual exercise. my -- trained a boxer's nose around people the exercise and had to show tremendous courage on their side, but remained engaging in a buck and the ideas getting those ideas to be real on the page so others can understand that and engage them to me it is my maximum energy a
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2009 6:30am EDT
passionate and sometimes even violent, large swaths of white middle class america became very frightened that their normal expectations of law and order were being upended. and richard nixon kind of harvested that rage and he took political advantage of that rage and not only did he harvest it but he also exacerbated it as a political strategy. >> how? >> well, for example, he argued privately, although some of his aids said it publicly, that they wanted to achieve a strategy of positive polarization. in other words, it's good to have a political discourse that divides the country into two powerful their belief that the republicans would harvest the bigger side of the divide. so in other words, even though in much of his public rhetoric he would, you know, speak the words of unity that we expect our presidents to speak all the time, barely beneath the surface he encouraged the idea that one group of americans would believe another group of americans weren't quite american at all. one was the hippies and kids who want to tear down everything all us hard-working americans had built. >> was
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2009 10:00pm EDT
are no longer america. simple as that. >> host: of the great ironies here, the founding fathers, the reason they began this space experiment was based on two things, freedom of worship and freedom of speech. and this is why it is so vital to protect talk radio and in particular conservative talk radio. >> guest: the government has no right to sit in the editor's chair or to control content through regulation, period. >> host: this is about protecting the first amendment, our bill of rights and great constitution. brian jennings, thank you for joining me today. >> guest: thank you. >> host: the book is called quote go censorship the threat to silence talk radio the new fairness doctrine exposed." the author is brian jennings. i am monica crowley. thank you so much for being with us today. .. >> i guess i thought i would talk or a bid to while some they also like to do we have a small group feel free to fill in but how many of you watch cnbc? many if you are cnbc viewers we may have a pretty educated viewership so i am curious five like to do this in small groups or large groups how many of y
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2009 3:00pm EDT
, but more for an america that they had left at home and also for a changing america, one that the ford motor company, their employers, their employer, was largely responsible with dispatching. there's something about the amazon when one reads the chronicles of the amazon. the amazon almost induces people to wax philosophically or existentially in a very florid allegory about the enormous nature of the amazon, how it seduces man to impose his will and only to render that will implement. think of verna heard sog's interview in burden of dreams, just the way that people talk about the amazon as this place and the of moral meaning and very florid. there is something about though the men and women that ford sent down, most of them from michigan, a lot of them also from the upper peninsula down to the amazon. they were almost immune or inoculated. they had a certain midwestern stubborn little less that refused to see the amazon in those six essential terms. was actually relief reading about it, but then they would wax nostalgic but again certain nostalgia for receiving in a lost united states. it
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2009 6:00pm EDT
in places of america that are named after kosciuszko. and those of you that thought this would be a discussion about kosciuszko mustard that takes place at your local deli every day. [laughter] know, this is about thaddeus kosciuszko, the peasant prints in the age of revelation. kosciuszko was a prince of tolerance to stop for the disenfranchisement of all religions and genders he was probably the greatest humanitarian of his era. in 1817 when the news of his death and exile in switzerland spread through europe funeral masses were held in catholic, lutheran and calvinist churches. even the jewish temples and muslim mosques helped services where the worshipers prayed for god to take kosciuszko's sold to heaven. think about it, europe have gone through decades ethnic and religious strife see it everybody paid for his soul. .. kosciuszko's birth was augustus and he was elected thanks to the love of his lover, catherine the great of russia. russia started to have more and more of an impact on polish society at this time so a lot of poles were trying to figure out ways to help drive
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2009 11:00am EDT
? and then you wonder why a politician can score points with crowds in south america by claiming to stand up to the damn yankees. there is this heritage of there. i don't know if this country will ever be able to overcome this fear and suspicion, considering that the war was bad enough what went on for the next 150 years. you know, an old world power politics termed the united states is the natural hegemon of the western hemisphere. it is the most powerful economically, militarily. but you don't have to act like. and in the long run it's a losing thing. the sun has set on the british empire, for instance. >> what would be your view of the intercontinental north to south road -- >> everything i know about that, there's some misbegotten highway structure construction projects that will probably never get off the ne. >> would you say it's so embedded and not to be forgotten by the south or mexico? i don't ever see harmony coming out of the. >> well, i would think so. i like mexico. it's a country with a sad, sad history. it started out almost without chance. so did the other latin america count
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2009 4:00pm EDT
. j. o'rourke examined america's love affair with cars which he believes has contributed to its cultural decline. the automotive museum in los angeles hosted this event, it is 45 minutes. >> i want to thank you for coming to this book signing. i am the director of the museum here. earnings is an honor for me personally as well as the museum. .. >> pretty well rounded writer and what i love most about him is his ear refer vans and the way he turns a phrase and honest to god, i twant say it, it's the truth he is by far my favorite author and i have all of his box and the first part of the book it lists all the books he has written and i think 3 or 4 of them are "new york times" best-seller books, and, if you hand read "parliament at wars" or "give war a chance" or "all the trouble in the world" read those books and what is interesting about pj and, interesting in the book, and one of my question to him later, are they going to make a movie about your book, a lot of stuff he talks about, that goes back to the '70s and '80s is as true today as it was then and you keep reading the st
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2009 11:00pm EDT
was the biggest, what was your biggest surprise in america? he turned to me and said i can't believe you eagen your cars. [laughter] we got a big chocolate of this because in france eating is a sacrament. we yvgeny short lanchester have fresh bread, good wine and time enough to enjoy it but it is a very different thing than driving down the highway with the quarter pounder and fries in your lap, a soft drink large enough to have an undertow sloshing around in the cup holder, your fingers between bites so you don't get greece on the wheel. i am kidding of course a we don't really eat this way, do we? get ready to cringe. the american culinary institute did a study that found among 18 to 50-year-old americans, roughly one-fifth of paul eating takes place in the car. significant percentage of the rest takes place in front of the tv. if that is the way most of my fellow americans want to take their meals, of course i would not call the meals as much as eating occasions but if that is how we choose to take our nutritional input every day all i can say is the bhola fronts because, i am going to read
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2009 9:15am EDT
senator mcgovern in rome and said i think this is so much sense not only showing america's compassion but to bring children to school in developing countries and especially the young girls who will then go to school and their lives will be so much better because of it. this was george's inspiration and thank goodness he came up with the idea that became a reality more than eight years ago and will continue to make certain that people around the world have a fighting chance. it's the story of his public career. it's a story of george mcgovern as a person. it's the reason we're here tonight, not only to acknowledge his reflections on abraham lincoln but to acknowledge that he is, in fact, one of america's political heroes. george mcgovern. >> thank you, dick. thank you. [applause] >> well, i want to thank everybody who is here tonight. if i had known i was going to get that kind of praise from these people who are on either side of me here tonight, i'd written that book a lot earlier. [laughter] >> but i do want to thank bernie for opening up his beautiful home here tonight for us. and
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2009 12:00pm EDT
latin america pursued in the 1970's, the one part of the world that did not have a major crisis after oil prices rose. and evidently peopl studied what they did and they got excited about that finance as a way to get out of the problem of rising oil prices. but they forgot that latin america ran into problems and they had a debt crisis in the beginning of the 19 eighties that led to the lost decade in latin america. that is one reason for is that the asian sufficiency the second reason is related to e crisis that the world faced one decade ago with the global financial -- financial crisis of set 97/98 the reason they split was handled was a disaster countries lost economic sovereignty, the imf push them into pro cyclical policy is that converted a downturn in to recession and a recession into a depression. if you want to get a feeling of how badly things can be mismanage, unemployment in the central island in indofesia got up at 40% so we have a way to go to reach those achievements. the consequence of this bad management with the global financial crisis was countries decided they wou
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2009 5:00pm EDT
in less than 48 hours. emmett till's execution had touched black hearts. ricans born in america, now saw the end game. white supremacy. nationalism. rage. violence. and ignorant sent us this message from the hellhole of mississippi. now, apartheid america was public news. was state news, was national news, was world news because jet magazine for that week when its convention, the black community nationwide putn muscle, shoes, and resistance. rthshaking was beginning. emmett till's murder helped inflame the movement and march for freedom. may be emmett till took up the memory. she didn't let hiseath become history's forgotten page. in alabama, a woman named rosa parks was quietly readying herself to give backbone to a nati defeat. her active if i heard our introduction to a new movement. martin luther king jr. the united states was in his, hour and his history. 's futube about to be rewritten. that's just a sore section from the book. and in the book -- [applause] >> this picture right here on the left, that's paul roberson. and under it, i write hockey adopted paul rerson and wb devoid a
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2009 5:00am EDT
spent years in latin america. you can't believe if you haven't had that experience, what life expanding experience it is for you to learn another language and to be able to put yourself intellectually, spirituall emotionally and linguistically into another language and the addition of langues is something that strengthens you, enhances you, giv you more capability to negotiate your world, and to be a healthy human being, in the 21st century. i think we need to be having the conversation about how we make our children -- assist our children in becoming multi-lingual, rher than having a debate about whether we should be mono lingual in either standard english or black english. [applause]. >> well, i would like to piggy back on dr. dobson's point. as i indicated, in my introduction, i am the president of the american educational research association, which is the largest association of educational researchers actually in the world and aera has now gone into collaboration with other international associations from around the world, to form whate now call the world educational research assoc
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2009 5:40pm EDT
america, and chicago review press is kind of our publishing editorial armed. >> we've been talking with elizabeth malzahn of chicago review press. >> charles barkley, how long have you been writing? >> i guess since the first grade, but i never started doing it as a living until i was in my early 30s. i just decided one day i couldn't stand working for anyone. so i just started writing. i was an instant success. i start for about 10 years, and then i have a serious, if you run a bad restaurant and you have deep enough profits, you will eventually make it because you will find all of your people in your neighborhood that like bad food. >> your first book was? >> killing the hidden water. i was hired by a think tank government contract to write about water use in the southwest, aquifers, turned it in probably fired. did it circulated as a kind of, it was one of those federal contracts. and the university of texas called me up. somehow it drifted into there. i did know anything about them. it is still in print probably because no one buys. they have all of these copies stacked a. that
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2009 5:50am EDT
documents that about $100 billion bill in remittances back to latin america, $100 billion during by immigrants, legal and illegal, but earned by immigrants in that grassley i was born direct investment or foreign aid together so this is efforts from the immigrants themselves to do what we have a great interest in seeing done to some support for development. >> and they do pay taxes. >> if we are to permit the next panel to start -- i am very sorry to "mary todd lincoln", and it craig symonds, author of "lincoln and his admirals". >> i'm distinguished prof. of history and the chair of the curriculum with on peace, war and friends at the university of north carolina chapel hill. today we have two outstanding box covers one written by dr. 12 -- jean baker, she is a professor of history, she received her ph.d. at johns hopkins under david donnels, she is the author of numerous books including a biography of james buchanan and sisters, the lives of america suffragists, perhaps her best book is a there's a party, political culture of northern democrats in the mid-19th century, and toda
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2009 9:00am EDT
attracted interest from america's beat necks in the 1950's. coincidentally with the interest of american diplomats and the central intelligence agency, people like jack karowac, who was an absolutely unknown writer, were developing an interest in buddhism, generally. first in zen buddhism and secondly through the work of robert campbell in buddhism. the mid 1950's were a period of cultural ferment in the united states with the beat neck movement that would eventually become the support basis for the tibetan resistance, but eventually took about 20 years, because something else was happening in 1955 when geshae sailed into new york harbor. here in washington, d.c., president eisenhower was trying to figure out how best to fight against international communism. in a series of national security council meetings throughout 955, he had been presented with options from open warfare to covert sub version of russian and chinese communist activity around the world. it was only recently learned that in the early 1950's, the u.s. intelligence services had picked up definitive information that russi
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2009 1:00am EDT
that impacted me and my family and everybody else in america because that was write-up to the time i finished by teeing the book and taking the notes. . . congressional correspondent for the huffingtonpost.com presents a history of drug use and culture in the united states including opium in new york in the 19th century, drug experimentation in the 1960's and the debates about the legalization of marijuana. he explains why certain trucks popular at certain times in history and gives his thoughts on the government's war on drugs. back pages books in massachusetts holds this event. it lasts about an hour. >> i'm constantly asking myself what is the point of the reading and how we make the idea of an author talk or reading sound less boring and the issue is so few of us have the time in a date to peace these things together six hinckley and brilliantly and watching ryan talk about something as boring as government policy but how it really represented something on a map, a shift in how drugs mover of this country and with their related to in terms of what we need and what we use, what we desire a
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2009 9:00am EDT
as well last september 14, openly sold to bank of america i felt would be a good example. so that's what i tried to do in the book. there are any number of different things i think that our significant in terms of the focus, but other things that i was trying to do more to combat some of the i think myths that are out there that have been promulgated. for example, that fannie mae and freddie mac caused the economic crisis or caused the credit crisis. visited something that is been bandied about certainly in political circles. and it is really not a big fannie mae and freddie mac at many wrong things but ultimately, if you read the book, i think i try and explain that it was in fact their absence from the market for mortgages that allow wall street to move in and overlake ao many of the problems that we currently are still suffering from. rather than their irresponsibility in terms of offering subprime mortgages and the like. what fannie and freddie did was try to gain back market share that they ultimately had lost to wall street. as you can judge from the title, of course, i dewpoint the
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2009 11:00am EDT
. it was the greatest intelligence failure since the trojan horse. and how with a budget in america leading up to 9/11 did this happen. so there are five big intelligence agencies as you know. the cia, fbi, dia. national security intelligence and the state department has what. the old one that a citizen like me, a reporter without subpoena power could actually investigate look into was the fbi. and particularly, because the war on terror as we know it, with the exception of a few missiles that were fired into khartoum into the clinton years, the war on terror really was conducted as a legal case is, investigated by the two what we call bin laden offices of origin. the new york office of the fbi which i'll refer to repeatedly today, known as the n. y. oh, and the office of u.s. attorney for the southern district of new york. and these incredibly, federal agencies, the bureau, this is the biggest outside of washington, the best of the best, the original joint terrorist task or was set up in his office and of course his house rudy giuliani, who later became a federal judge and fbi director and of cour
CSPAN
Aug 1, 2009 11:00pm EDT
the very structure on which it rests. i call him jump skeet. being an american, working in america writing to convince americans of his pointed you must really be like having to tunnel through hardwood. chomsky is one of a small band of individuals fighting a coal industry and that makes them not only brilliant, but heroic. [applause] his work, so prolific, his personal support for so many so important. just this afternoon norm finkelstein was telling me how he had visited nome one summer at the beginning when he came back at the end and noam had already written two books, so he said to a friend, noam just finished two books and his friend said, so i read two books this summer to. he said no, but he wrote them. [laughter] and a think calling noam chomsky in turkey, it was february of 2002. he had not just gone there to speak, but to stand with the young publisher, who was facing years in prison for publishing noam chomsky's work. i called noam to interview him before he went to court, not knowing what would happen to him as well. when i rang him up, he answered the phone and he said amy, d
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2009 11:15am EDT
.s. intervention against spain over cuba. we can perhaps talk about that more later. but that was america's entry to the world stage and a crucial event in the life of the country. the really exciting episode in the newspaper war in new york at the time. by the end of about three years hearst had emerged not only as the largest circulating publisher in the city, but the voice of the democratic party in the u.s. and the voice of the left really in the u.s. at the time. he went on to found what was the greatest publishing empire in america. it was comprised of about 28 daily newspapers and a bunch of magazines. after a radio network in addition to his motion picture empire. of course hurst on the blocks of manhattan real estate, ate, as . all started with his success in new york city. that made the empire he built possible. that is generally what the book is about. i'll leave it to allen to guide us through the rest of the conversation. >> there are a number of ridings of hearst. what was it that convinced you there was more to say? >> well, it was the way other biographers treated his journalism t
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2009 12:30am EDT
wife inside america's new rootless professional class i objected to that, to the publisher's decision to call this glass new. it goes back to the origins of world trade to the east india company and hudson bay company. there is nothing particularly new to be a fruitless soldier and diplomat or preacher or businessman or woman for decades ibm employees have said the initial stand for i have been moved. what is new, the relos themselves, the breadwinners -- i will start -- what is new is growth in numbers of corporate relos, a figure i estimate to be about 10 million people, that is the breadwinners themselves and their families and how that has grown with the growth of the american economy. american foreign trade to cite a statistical the goods and services we buy and sell abroad has leaped from about $400 million in 1970 to over 3 trillion now as companies american and foreign compete. they need people to carry their banner and build business far from home. you've not heard the word reloville because i made it up. it is about workers and families frequently relocating, they are see re
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2009 7:00pm EDT
to society. not tt scientists don't, but use it in the context to reacng out to nonscientific america. and i worked with her on initiative on a chapter in the book and that is science debate 2008. and some of you heard of and some of you signed on to support it. basically, sheryl, myself, screen writers, and a couple other people had the idea. one guy in popular, matthew chapman, it was his idea originally,he president should talk about science. there should be in debate many in which they talk abo science. and it was resonating for the community. we had no trouble getting scores of university to endorse a long list something like 38,000 individual people signing up. we became a movement. and we were really psyched. look at wt we've done. we've rallied the world of science around a cause. then we learned the harsh lesson. if you build it, that doesn't mean the politicians will come. and so that experience gots thinking again in the direction of the book. why ist that politicians don't want to talk about science even if all the greatest minds ask them to do so? why ds that scare them perhaps
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2009 7:00am EDT
in less than 48 hours. emmett till's execution had touched black hearts. africans born in america now saw the endgame. white supremacy, nationalism, rage, violence, and ignorance sent us its message from the hellhole of mississippi. now artheid was state news, national news, was world news because "jet" magazine for that week, the black community nationwide put on muscle, shoes, and resistance, either-shaking was beginning. emmett till's death held for a movement of march of a nation his mother did not let his death of history's forgotten page. in alabama, a woman named lowsa parks was quietly readying herself to give backbone to a nation of feet. her act of defiance heard our introduction to a new moses, martin luther king, jr.. the united statesas soon to meet his, ours and his future about to be rewritten. that's a short section from the book. and in the book -- [applause] >> this picture right here on the left, that's paul roberson. and this w.b. dubois. and under it i write, haki opted paul robeson and w.b. dubois as his cultural grandfathers. thank you ry much. [applause] >> thank y
CSPAN
Aug 2, 2009 5:00pm EDT
in washington, and i may not be the best journalists in america, but i figured there was a story behind it. this is the kind of helmet that was worn by soldiers in the british empire in the late 19th century when the british empire was in its glory, and they used to say the sun never sets on the union jack meaning that the british flag was flying somewhere in the world. there is the story about this helmet and about bruce, and it relates to you. i'm going to put this away for now and tell the story a title bit later. i'm not a gang expert. you're the gang experts. i am a writer. "no boundaries" is not an academic work. not a textbook concept sociology. it not is an encyclopedia of latino gangs. it is not a handbook for investigators. there are very good books like that that i have read that are available. some of them on the web site of the cgia written by gang detectives in orange county. but what my book, "no boundaries," and it is a work of journalism, narrative nonfiction. it tells real stories about real people in real cases. i aim to describe through the story the story of the trauma
CSPAN
Aug 2, 2009 9:00am EDT
," fulfilling america's destiny. published in 1991. and he has also published almost literally countless articles in major newspapers and journals. he served as a member of the state department advisory committee on democracy promotion, and he is a member of several editorials awards, including i am proud to say that of the journal of democracy. on my far right, doctor a sollie who spent many years as a practicing physician. is the president and founder of the american task force on palestine. he has testified before congress on palestinian issues several times, and in may 2008 he served as a member of the presidential delegation to the palestine investment conference in bethlehem. he is also the founder and chairman of the american charities for palestine, which works with the u.s. agency for international development to help meet the palestinian humanitarian needs. mr. cooper sitting next to my right is a senior director for the middle east and north africa here at the national endowment of democracy. in 2005, he took a leave her in which time he served as senior adviser to prime minis
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2009 5:00pm EDT
of america than what americans are doing to get high. life in the united states of course a similar in many ways to live anywhere in the developed world. but our nation diverges sharply from the rest of the world in a few crucial ways. americans work hard. 135 hours a year more than the average briton, 240 hours more than the typical french worker and 370 hours, nine weeks, more than the average german. we also play hard. a global survey released in 2008 found americans are more than twice as likely to smoke pot as europeans. 42% of americans have puffed at one point, citizens from various nations were all under 20. we are also four times as likely as spaniards to have done coke and roughly ten times more likely than the rest of europe. quote, we are just a different kind of country, said the u.s. drugs are spokesman tom riley when asked about the survey. quote, we have how your drug use rates, higher crime, many things that with a free and mobile society. different, indeed. there may be no people on earth with a more twisted complex relationship to drugs. much of our preconceived self-imag
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2009 11:00am EDT
america has ever produced. when he died in the spring of 1870, 10000 people attended his funeral, and flags across the nation were hung at half mast. the president of the united states, ulysses s. grant, general william tecumseh sherman, joseph hooker, philip sheridan, george gordon meade, and other notables overrate were among the vast concourse of mourners who gathered to pay their respects. his passing was considered a national calamity. today, textbooks often omit him or giving up just a few lines. yet no man was more responsible for thomas for the union victory in the war. how may we summarize his life? born into a slaveholding family in virginia, not far from the site of the climactic battle of the revolutionary war at yorktown, he chafed early on that the system of slavery that sustain his family's wealth. as a boy, he told the families slays how to read and write it is said against his parents wishes, and if not quite an abolitionist as a young man, he was one in the making, as revealed by his conduct in subsequent years. at the age of 19, he went off to west point, did w
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2009 8:00am EDT
of america using african-american format, buffer to jewish americans, catholic americans, two arab-americans, to asian-americans, to latino market, to western indian americans. so we go into production right away for that. but it turns out that the kumar family has one of the largest collection of lincoln memorabilia in the whole world. and so they are lincoln junkies. two years ago he said, the grandfather or great-grandfather started collecting lincoln memorabilia right after he was killed. and they haven't heard this huge collection. so he said, 2009 is bicentennial of lincoln's birth and we want you to write and host and narrate a series that i said i don't anything about abraham lincoln. he freed the slaves. and he said that's why we want you to do it. so i said to them, i didn't have to say that i said look, you know, this is going to be my lincoln. because if you want hagiography, then do with the standard pbs documentaries do about when they are addressing the black world, which is they get some white guy to write and then they get benzo or morgan to read it, you, with a vo
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2009 2:00pm EDT
was the anti-edison. thomas edison invented money. it was business. it was america. rutherford was of english school, as later was a young man named tim berners-lee who felt the scientific publication should be opened and the wayside, rutherford never had a patent in his life. the wayside advancely by opening this dissemination of information, that there was some kid in new zealand who would read this and figure out the next step. and that's the kind of size i wanted to write about. when rutherford died, he died rather early in the late 30s. his bank account was 7000 pounds, which was exactly his own nobel prize money in 1911. i will than by talking about the new times once had a very bright science editor named comfort. and in "the new york times" magazine in 1936, he wrote what these people did, einstein, rutherford, or eisenberg, plunk, the heroes of the heroic age of physics. and this is what he said they did. suppose that nobody on earth had ever heard a piece of music. and suppose that beethoven's fifth symphony is played over and over again by invisible musicians. that this is his prob
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2009 10:00am EDT
soldiers every stance of dollars to see how much of america they could claim asserting power of those who recognized no such a 48 the british and france bought. they lost and in 1773 american territories were divided between britain and spain with a land called louisiana. than the british americans rebelled against their king. the idea people could govern themselves without royal separation-- supervisions sent a shock wave. france took back louisiana and so the black men invaded spain. the french king decided to extend his power to america of the ruling class did not like the ideas of they took up arms out of their rebellion was born a new country, meco which have a flag bearing a cactus mounted by a ego that held a stake in its peak. meanwhile the anglo american's guarded against the borders of mexico their symbol is also the ego it is a american gle there were shipped the bird dog they displayed ever were even on buttons and gold buckles of the soldiers to terrified of stapp's with eagles. this time it is not one ego but to if they were about to wage their own struggle for the empire. 6
CSPAN
Aug 30, 2009 8:00pm EDT
of people to america. what was intriguing to me about this case was that the govement was making her out to be kind of a godfather figure, a sort of a pretty reprehensible human being who had been really motivated by greed d had been pretty ruthless and engaged in organized crime here in new york. but in chinatown she was a popular figure. people were watching the case closely, and she had a lot of support in chinatown and also in china. that sort of disconnect was part of what appealed to me initially. this idea that here was this person who was providing a service. she was bringing people out of china without the proper documentation and around t rld through a whole series o different way stations from thailand to keny to guatemala, and then to the united states, and these journeys were often incredibly perilous, hazards you journey. one of the ships, the golden vee, hat been at sea for 120 days by the time the passenger goes here. they had been in the hold of the ship for 120 days. that didn't mean anything to me but if you think about it, 300 people in a space, probably if we started
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2009 2:45pm EDT
them. in north america, beneath the great plains, fossil remains of marine creatures had been found. just imagine, 5,000 miles from the sea, at altitudes of 4,000 feet, they had found fossils of a sea creature, among them, the giant reptiles. had she heard tell of this and friendly fellow? you can look today at barack prince of an animal that has been extinct for millions of years that lived and feasted in these rocks were being formed on the floor of the seat. imagine the power that tumbled these rocks from the seabed and thrust them up so i. los angeles, where oil seeped to the surface, and its volatile elements evaporated, a vast leg of package was formed, and sheets of water gathered above it and the ancestors of the wolf came to drink and died, trapped in the swamp. no one could tell how long does oil had been leaking. among the skeleton they found while extracting the pitch were some belonging to the saber tooth tiger, another ugly customer. it had ceased to have a beer 50,000 years ago. always, as he talked, his own sense of the miraculous came to him. informed of his words a
CSPAN
Aug 8, 2009 9:00pm EDT
don't you think president obama has succeeded in utterly altering the view of america and people's minds that he has brought credibility to american democracy which probably did not exist before? >> a very interesting question because it goes back literally to the period when barack obama started thinking seriously about running which is late summer 2006 he took a trip to africa and on that trip he came back with a belief, a feeling that the election of and african american, him in particular, would have an instant affect how the world saw the country. even if there was not an important change of policy which she was still advocating, that act alone would say something about america that would make the world look differently and that has been the case. if you look at a recent study that looks at the approval ratings of obama it is unbelievable. there is that potential for him out there. i think the problem or challenge for him is it is one thing to begin to make the old bridge to talk about a different kind of america or engagement with the world under president bush but as you g
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